Published on November 13, 2018

Phoenixville Hospital Awarded Advanced Certification in Heart Failure

Phoenixville Hospital today announced that it has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® and the American Heart Association’s Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification in Heart Failure. The Gold Seal of Approval® and the Heart-Check mark represent symbols of quality from their respective organizations.

Phoenixville Hospital underwent a rigorous on-site review recently. Joint Commission experts evaluated compliance with disease-specific care standards as well as with heart failure-specific requirements. The certification recognizes heart failure programs that include either a hospital-based and hospital-owned outpatient heart failure clinic or have a collaborative relationship with one or more attending cardiology practices.

“Phoenixville Hospital has thoroughly demonstrated a high level of care for patients who are being treated for heart failure,” said Patrick Phelan, Executive Director, Hospital Business Development, The Joint Commission. “We commend Phoenixville Hospital for becoming a leader in heart failure care, potentially providing a higher standard of service for cardiac patients in its community.”

“We congratulate Phoenixville Hospital for this outstanding achievement,” said Nancy Brown, chief executive officer, the American Heart Association. “This certification reflects their commitment to providing the highest quality of care for patients with heart failure.”

“Phoenixville Hospital is pleased to receive advanced certification from The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association,” said Kathleen Clarke, RN, MS, CCRN, Clinical Nurse Manager Med-Surg, Telemetry and PCU Units, Phoenixville Hospital. “The certification provides us with the opportunity to highlight the exceptional heart failure care we provide as well as to continually strive to advance our care even further.”

Established in 2010 and awarded for a two-year period, The Joint Commission’s Advanced Certification in Heart Failure was developed in collaboration with an external task force of experts and organizations with expertise in heart failure care, including representatives from the American Heart Association, Heart Failure Society of America and the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses.

To be eligible for Advanced Certification in Heart Failure, health care providers must have achieved at least a Bronze level of performance from the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Heart Failure program and established a comprehensive heart failure-focused program staffed by qualified medical professionals. By participating in the program, the hospital also must use the latest scientific research developed to meet individualized patient needs.

More than an estimated 5 million Americans suffer from heart failure, a condition in which the heart can’t pump enough blood to the body’s other organs, according to the American Heart Association. Although the heart keeps working, it’s not as effective as it should be. Each year, about 825,000 new cases are diagnosed and more than 275,000 will die of heart failure. However, many patients can lead a full life through a combination of medication and lifestyle changes.